Category Archives: August

Call for Papers: Central States Law Schools Association

Call for Papers:

The purpose of CSLSA is to foster scholarly exchanges among law faculty across legal disciplines.  The annual CSLSA conference is a forum for legal scholars, especially more junior scholars, to present working papers or finished articles on any law-related topic in a relaxed and supportive setting where junior and senior scholars from various disciplines are available to comment.  More mature scholars have an opportunity to test new ideas in a less formal setting than is generally available for their work. 

To allow scheduling of the conference, please send abstract or précis of no more than 500 words to Secretary Wes Oliver at wmoliver@widener.edu by August 31, 2010; earlier statements of interest would be helpful.  Every effort will be made to accommodate all interested participants.

Contact Information:

If you have any other questions about this conference, please contact any of our officers:

President, Gregory Gordon, University of North Dakota School of Law, gordon@law.und.edu
Vice President, Jelani Jefferson Exum, University of Kansas School of Law, jjeffers@ku.edu
Secretary, Wes Oliver, Widener University School of Law, wmoliver@widener.edu
Treasurer, Carolyn Dessin, University of Akron School of Law, cld3@uakron.edu

http://www.cslsa.us/CSLSA%202010%20Conference%20Initial%20Announcement.doc

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Call for Papers: The Twentieth British Legal History Conference

Date(s) of Conference:

July 13-16, 2011

Location:

University of Cambridge

Contact Information:

The conference addresses the intersection between law and legal process, the ways in which the processes of courts and other tribunals, the practices of judges and lawyers, and the needs of litigants, influence each other and shape the development of the law; and the influences in turn of legal doctrine upon the practices of those coming into contact with the law.

Call for Papers:

The conference organisers welcome papers concerning all jurisdictions, branches of the law and historical periods. Ideally, papers should reflect the conference theme. Papers reflecting the results of innovative legal history research are most welcome. Submissions from doctoral students are encouraged.

Proposals for papers (up to 500 words) are invited, to reach the organisers – preferably by email attachment (in Word or pdf format) sent to the address below – by 31 August 2010. If potential contributors are unsure whether their proposals suitably reflect the theme, the organisers are very happy to be contacted informally by email: LawBLHC@hermes.cam.ac.uk.

Contact Information:    

 LawBLHC@hermes.cam.ac.uk

http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/press/news/2010/04/the-twentieth-british-legal-history-conference-call-for-papers/1233

Call for Papers: Alternative Court Systems

Call for Papers:

The Richmond Journal of Law and the Public Interest seeks articles for a fall symposium on alternative court systems. Articles could address issues related to Family Court, Drug Court, Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court, Benefits, Effects on Recidivism, and all other relevant topics. Submission is rolling, but deadline is August 10, 2010. Articles will be published Fall 2010. Authors may be invited to speak at the symposium at the University of Richmond. Submission guidelines are here.

Contact Information:

http://rjolpi.richmond.edu/submissions.php

http://legalscholarshipblog.com/2010/07/28/call-for-papers-alternative-court-systems/

Stanford Law & Policy Review: Defense Policy Symposium

Call for Papers:

The Defense Policy symposium is focused on recent changes and trends affecting national security and the ways in which law and policy may need to adapt in order to respond to these changes.

Specifically, topics that we would like to cover in the symposium include:

  • Veteran Affairs
  • New Realms of Warfare (e.g. cyber-warfare, threat finance, etc.)
  • Law of War (e.g. targeted killing, detention, etc.)
  • Nation Building
  • Counter-Insurgency/ Counter-Terrorism
  • Privatization and War (e.g. the role of private companies in modern warfare)
  • Energy, Environment, and Defense

Our goal is to have a well-rounded symposium that contributes new and useful ideas on this important range of topics. Selected articles will be published in May 2011. Authors will be invited to present their articles at a conference on “National Defense Policy” at Stanford University.

We will accept article submissions until August 1, 2010. Articles should be between ten and forty double-spaced pages, not including notes and citations.

Also, if you have an idea for an article, but have not written it yet, we can pre-approve your article for publication if you submit a three to five page proposal to us; the earlier we receive a proposal, the greater the chance we can pre-approve it for publishing. Articles and proposals should be submitted via e-mail to slpr.defense.symposium@gmail.com.

Contact Information:

Please direct any questions to the Article Editor, Kent Keirsey at keirsey@stanford.edu.

http://slpr.stanford.edu/upcoming.html

Stanford Law & Policy Review: Prison Reform Symposium

Call for Papers:

Through the Prison Reform symposium, we plan to explore the many ways that prison management has come under increased pressure during this time of economic hardship and increased judicial activism. While mass incarceration and prison release have been frequently addressed in the news lately, we would like to explore more deeply how decreasing budgets and judicial activism have affected the management of prisoners inside the system, especially in terms of both reform pressures as well as opportunities for experimentation. We welcome submissions on any subject relating to prison reform including, but not limited to:

  • In the changing economic times, how can the prison system effectively handle the fact that they are forced to put aside their aspirational goals for more pragmatic goals, possibly for decades? How are goals prioritized, and how will the system return to pursuing aspirational goals?
  • Privatization of prison management and increasing reliance on outside service providers
  • Health care in prisons and the effects of economics on healthcare, including care for the elderly and disability access, and judicial activism in prisoner healthcare
  • Racial integration and segregation, especially as part of gang management and forced cell integration
  • Increasing complications of management with gender, transgender, and sexuality issues
  • Immigration issues and language access in prisons
  • Education, rehabilitation, and sobriety programs, and involvement by community and faith organizations
  • Solutions for decreasing prison rape, and increasing reporting, discipline and prison guard accountability
  • Alternative sentencing schemes that give trial judges greater flexibility, parole board pressures, actuarial prediction instruments for parole release and revocation
  • The increasing presence of youth in adult prisons
  • How life term inmates impact negatively and positively the prison culture
  • The decreasing or increasing power of prison guard unions
  • The effects of the transfer of funding from state to county budgets

Additionally, authors will be invited to present their articles at a live symposium at Stanford Law School during the 2010 – 2011 academic year. The article submissions deadline is August 15, 2010. Articles should be between ten and forty double-spaced pages, not including notes and citations. Please contact us at your earliest convenience to discuss your submission. To submit an article, please e-mail it to slpr.prisonreform@gmail.com.

Contact Information:

Please direct any questions to the Article Editor, Veronica Arrambide at varrambide@stanford.edu.

http://slpr.stanford.edu/upcoming.html

The Labor and Employment Law Colloquium

Date(s) of Conference:

September 24-25, 2010

Location:

 St. Louis, Missouri

Description:

Washington University Law School and St. Louis University Law School are pleased to announce that they are co-hosting the Colloquium on Current Scholarship in Labor and Employment Law on September 24-25, 2010 in St. Louis, Missouri.

The Colloquium, now in its fifth year, provides an opportunity for labor and employment law scholars to present works-in-progress and receive feedback from their colleagues in the field. 

The colloquium will meet on Friday, September 24 and Saturday, September 25, and will be organized around panel presentations of papers in related areas. Topics will include issues in Employment Law, Employment Discrimination, Labor Law and Employee Benefits, including international and comparative work in these fields.

Call for Papers:

The St. Louis University Law Journal will publish a symposium issue in connection with the colloquium. Interested authors should submit their articles to the journal by December 1, 2010, and authors whose articles are chosen will be notified by February 1, 2011. More details on the submission process will be available at the colloquium.

If you would like to register and submit an abstract for a paper to be presented at the colloquium, please click here.  The deadline for submission of abstracts is August 15, 2010.

Contact Information:

Shelly Ford
Washington University Law
314.935.7988
sford@wulaw.wustl.edu

http://law.wustl.edu/centeris/pages.aspx?ID=7882

Tribes, Land, and the Environment

Date(s) of Conference:

February 25, 2011

Location:

American University
Washington College of Law
Washington, D.C.

Description:

Native American tribes have a far more complex relationship with the environment than is captured by the stereotype of Indians as environmental stewards. Meaningful tribal sovereignty requires non-Indians to recognize the right of Indians to determine their own relationship to the land and the environment. But tribes do not exist in a vacuum, they are deeply affected by off-reservation activities and similarly tribal choices often impact neighboring communities. Characterized in the 1830s by the U.S. Supreme Court as “domestic dependent nations,” Indian governments today have regulatory and governance authority over everything from air quality to the terms of mineral leases.

The number of Indian nations and the particular challenges faced by each tribe makes generalizations regarding either tribal environmental policies or the nature of the relationship between tribes and environmental organizations especially problematic. That being said, the centrality of land to many indigenous peoples offers the possibility that Indian understandings of environmental issues could inform non-Indian society. Reactions of non- Indian governments and environmental organizations to tribes that seek to develop in ways reflective, or not reflective, of off-reservation practices and policies shed light on how non-Indians view tribal sovereignty. Too often the multi-dimensionality of Indians is lost as they are reduced to an easily digestible typecasts of earth-loving conservationists or un-American groups that should fade into history.

Tribes face many challenges in attempting to establish their own developmental and environmental standards within the federal Indian law and environmental law structures. Native Americans living on reservations have among the highest levels of poverty and unemployment in the United States and, given the economic hardships of tribal members, tribal leaders have very difficult choices to make when it comes to environmental protection. Growing awareness of climate change will bring greater attention to the disproportionate impact global warming will have on vulnerable tribal communities – from ice-melt problems the Inuit are now struggling with to increased desertification of Navajo and Hopi reservation land – as well as on the significant impact tribal decisions can have on non-Indians. Universal agreement among scholars does not exist on such fundamental questions as whether tribes should be subject to federal environmental protection guidelines. Only by both acknowledging the value Indians place in land and simultaneously escaping the limitations inherent in such stereotypes can the complexities and challenges of Indian environmental issues be understood.

Rather than getting lost in theoretical discussions of what is sovereignty and how do tribes think about the environment, new insights can be gleaned from a focus on tribal land and property law. A reservation and tribal land- centric approach involves looking at the practice of tribal sovereignty, as experienced by Indians and non-Indians. Particular uses of tribal land will often be associated with off- reservation externalities and the same can be said for the impact uses of off-reservation land will have on Indian communities. Land issues are inherently local, as are development choices, and by focusing on tribes, land, and the environment, hopefully participants will add to the literature in novel and grounded ways.

Call for Papers:

Proposals: Please email Sarah.Krakoff@colorado.edu or erosser@wcl.american.edu proposed topics with your tentative title and abstract by Aug. 1, 2010. Selected proposals will be notified on a rolling basis, but by Aug. 15, 2010 at the latest. Topics of interest include everything from federal oversight of tribal environmental decisions to land and environmental institution building by tribal governments. If you have questions, please contact the conference organizers.

Completed Papers: The hoped for length of chapter contributions is approximately 10,000 words including references. Complete author guidelines will be sent to those whose proposals are accepted, but ideally endnotes/footnotes would be kept to a minimum for the sake of readability.

Contact Information:

Sarah Krakoff
University of Colorado Law School
407 Wolf Law Building Boulder, CO 80309
http://lawweb.colorado.edu/profiles/profile.jsp?id=31
Sarah.Krakoff@colorado.edu
(303) 492-2641

Ezra Rosser
American University Washington College of Law
4801 Massachusetts Ave, NW Washington, DC 20016
www.wcl.american.edu/faculty/rosser
erosser@wcl.american.edu
Note: Ezra will be in El Salvador until Jan. 2011 so if you would like to talk to him, please email him your number and a good time to call, or try 011-503-7023-7303.

http://www.wcl.american.edu/events/tle/