Category Archives: Criminal Law

Pluralism v. Harmonization: National Adjudication of International Crimes

Date(s) of Conference:

June 14-15, 2012

Location:

Trippenhuis, Amsterdam

Description:

The objective of the conference on Pluralism v. Harmonization is to contribute to the development of international criminal law by the exchange of thoughts between legal scholars and practitioners from international as well as domestic institutions. It focuses on the fragmentation of core crimes prosecutions at the international and domestic level.

Contact Information:

http://www.commoncivility.org/events/upcoming-events/pluralism-harmonization

Advertisements

1st Crimmigration Control Conference

Date(s) of Conference:

October 11-12, 2012

Location:

Universidade de Coimbra
Coimbra, Portugal

Description:

Over the past years, various authors have shown that migration policy and criminal law have increasingly become merged, mainly in the United States. Stumpf (2006) who has coined the term ‘crimmigration’, observes how immigration violations are increasingly addressed as criminal offenses. This label has spurred a vivid debate across nations and disciplines. At the same time, immigration law is also increasingly used as an instrument of crime control: rather than being rehabilitated and re-integrated in the country of residence, non-citizen criminals may lose their residence permits, in order to be excluded from the territory with the help of immigration law. Strongly related to the crimmigration trend is the development of a political and public discourse in which immigrants are increasingly seen and addressed as ‘dangerous others’, comparable to criminals. Whereas there is ample empirical evidence underlining the crimmigration trend, empirical research into the practice of ethnic/race/nationality profiling as a possible (un)intended result of crimmigration is still lacking.

For this first conference of the Crimmigration Control International Net of Studies we aim to bring together leading academics and junior scholars and practitioners from around the world who are interested in immigration issues, from a legal, sociological and interdisciplinary perspective in order to discuss these and other issues.

Call for Papers:

In order to participate, authors must submit their abstracts before July 1st, 2012. Abstracts must be written in the Congress official languages, Portuguese or English. Submissions should report original work that has not been previously published. Contributions that advance the theory or practice of any aspect of crimmigration and crime control are welcomed. This includes for example theoretical papers, practice case studies, empirical evaluation and methodological work. Abstracts must follow narrative format with 500 words, and the selection of a Topic Area and a Presentation Format (oral or written) is mandatory. Abstracts must include the author(s) identification, professional or academic affiliation (whenever applied) and contacts. Additionally, abstracts must comply with the following authoring guidelines:

1- Title, with a maximum of 100 characters (including spaces)/approximately 10 words;

2 – Three to five keywords arranged according to the relevance of their content in the presentation;

3- A brief description of the presentation goals, its theoretical framework, methodology, main conclusions and bibliographical references; Investigation works should include their objectives, hypotheses and methodological procedures, namely data collection dates, participants, research techniques and main results.

Abstracts can be sent to 1crimmigrationconference@crimmigrationcontrol.com.

Contact Information:

http://www.crimmigrationcontrol.com/

Technology and Crime: The Future of the Fourth Amendment in Public

Call for Papers:

New mass surveillance technologies are changing Fourth Amendment protections in public. Enhanced video cameras, GPS location devices, license plate readers, mobile body scanners, backscatter x-ray vans, facial recognition technology, drones, and satellite imaging, in combination, can all be directed at targeted geographic areas.  Combined with, or replacing, traditional “stop and frisk” or police surveillance tactics, these technologies have the potential to alter Fourth Amendment protections.  At the same time, intelligence-led policing strategies involving crime mapping and analysis have allowed law enforcement to identify areas of crime for targeted police intervention. This panel looks at the constitutional implications of these developments on the expectation of privacy.

Faculty members of AALS member and fee-paid law schools are eligible to submit papers. Foreign, visiting and adjunct faculty members, graduate students and fellows are not eligible to submit.  This call for papers is limited to those who have been teaching for six years or fewer as of July 1, 2012.  The due date for submission is August 15, 2012.  Any paper that has not yet been the subject of an offer of publication by August 15, 2012, is eligible for submission.

To facilitate anonymous review, please submit papers in electronic form to Professor Giovanna Shay (giovanna.shay@law.wne.edu). The paper should have identifying information contained on a cover sheet only; the cover page will be removed before the paper is distributed for review. The cover sheet should also include the year you began law teaching and a statement that the paper has not yet received any offers of publication.

Contact Information:

Professor Giovanna Shay
giovanna.shay@law.wne.edu

Exploding Prison Populations and Drug Offenders: Rethinking State Drug Sentencing

Call for Papers:

Frequently, state sentencing approaches to drug offenses fail to distinguish between serious traffickers and low-level violators. For example, in Indiana, a person selling $40 worth of crack cocaine faces the same sentence (i.e., 20 to 50 years in prison) as a major drug dealer. Indiana’s framework presents an extreme example of this phenomenon, but Indiana is not alone in its approach; many other states are experiencing unintended consequences of similar policies.  Long-term sentences for low-level drug offenders have contributed to the exponential growth in many states’ prison populations. Frequently, commentators question whether the expenses of this non-differentiating methodology are warranted in human and other costs. Among other topics, the conference will examine (1) whether the current system can be justified; (2) the deterrent effect on drug usage of long-term incarceration and widespread imprisonment; and, (3) whether the likelihood of apprehension and conviction affects the market for drugs. Submissions relating to drug sentencing are welcomed, especially submissions on the following subjects:

  • The costs and benefits to taxpayers of incarcerating low-level drug offenders
  • The impact of drug sentencing laws on minority groups and other affected communities
  • Whether the science of addiction can inform decisions regarding optimal responses to drug use and sales
  • Legislative approaches to the challenges of incarceration for drug offenses

Selected conference papers will be published in a special issue of the Valparaiso University Law Review.  To submit a paper for presentation at the conference, please provide an abstract of you work by email submission no later than Monday, August 27, 2012.  It should be addressed to Melissa Mundt, Associate Director of Academic Services, Valparaiso University Law at Melissa.Mundt@valpo.edu.

Contact Information:

Melissa Mundt
Associate Director of Academic Services
Valparaiso University Law
Melissa.Mundt@valpo.edu

ABA 2012 White Collar Crime Conference

Date(s) of Conference:

February 29 – March 02, 2012

Location:

Eden Roc Renaissance Miami Beach
4525 Collins Ave
Miami Beach, FL, 33140-3226

Description:

The faculty includes some of the leading white collar lawyers in the United States.  The keynote panels for the 2012 program will continue to focus on the role of ethics and corporate compliance in today’s business environment. 

Contact Information:

http://www.americanbar.org/calendar/2012/02/white_collar_crime.html

A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue: White Collar Crime & Business Bankruptcy

Date(s) of Conference:

November 4-5, 2011

Location:

Golden Gate University School of Law
San Francisco, CA

Description:

The American Bar Association, Business Law Section, Business Bankruptcy  Committee, Criminal Justice Section, White Collar Crime Committee and  the Golden Gate University School of Law proudly host a national  dialogue about freezing, seizing and distributing entity assets and  operating the entity at the intersection of complex white collar crime  prosecutions and business bankruptcy.  The conference will serve as part  of an ongoing discussion about lessons learned, recurring issues and  best practices.  The conference will feature leading voices from the  federal district and bankruptcy bench, Department of Justice, Criminal  and Civil Divisions from “Main Justice” and prominent U.S. Attorney’s  Offices, and Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as prominent  white collar crime and business bankruptcy practitioners and academics.

Contact Information:

Golden Gate University School of Law
536 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA 94105-2968
(415) 442-6600

http://www.ggu.edu/school_of_law/academic_law_programs/jd_program/bankruptcy_law

MassBay DNA and Civil Liberties Conference II

Date(s) of Conference:

November 10 – November 12, 2011

Location:

MassBay Community College
Wellesley Hills, MA

Description:

The conference will focus on forensic DNA analysis of human remains, in particular, bones, and will feature scientists who are experts in the field from around the world. A highlight of the conference will be a debate on familial testing –the controversial use of DNA and its impact on American civil liberties.

Contact Information:

Dr. Bruce Jackson 
bjackson@massbay.edu

http://www.massbay.edu/dnaconference.aspx