Category Archives: Property Law

Call for Papers: ABA Journal of Affordable Housing and Community Development Law

Call for Papers:

The Journal of Affordable Housing & Community Development Law, the legal publication of the American Bar Association’s Forum on Affordable Housing and Community Development Law, is currently seeking submissions from students, professors, and practitioners. The Journal publishes full-length articles, book reviews, and shorter commentaries on a wide range of affordable housing and community and economic development issues.

The Journal has extended the deadlines for the Fall 2011 issue (Vol. 21:1) until January 9, 2012 and the Winter 2012 issue (Vol. 21:2) until March 5, 2012.  Double-spaced manuscripts should be e-mailed to Jim Kelly, Editor-in-Chief, at J.Kelly@nd.edu and Wendy Smith, Managing Editor, at wjsmith@staff.abanet.org.

Contact Information:

Jim Kelly
Editor-in-Chief
J.Kelly@nd.edu

Wendy Smith
Managing Editor
wjsmith@staff.abanet.org

http://apps.americanbar.org/abastore/index.cfm?section=main&fm=Product.AddToCart&pid=5530100

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Major Developments in Redistricting

Date(s) of Conference:

October 14-15th, 2011

Location:

University at Buffalo Law School

Description:

In what some have called a “post-racial” America, conflicts about racial vote dilution and its remediation that dominated past redistricting cycles appear to have taken a back seat to broader questions about the legitimacy of the redistricting process. Against the background of high unemployment and significant regulatory failures, the public seems much less tolerant of legislators insulating themselves from voters by drawing safe districts for themselves. This appears to be true, not merely for congressional and statewide legislative redistricting, but also for redistricting by the far more numerous counties, cities, and other local jurisdictions. Across the country reform efforts are seeking transparency, greater openness to public participation, removal of redistricting from the hands of legislatures and governing bodies, and the design of more legitimate redistricting institutions and decision procedures. What these efforts amount to remains to be seen.

It is to explore and debate these trends that we bring nationally recognized scholars, experts, and practitioners together with advocates and participants in the current redistricting process at the Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy here at UB Law School.

The conference will also address process issues and redistricting at the local level. Redistricting at the county, city and other local levels, in particular, are rarely studied. As Bruce Cain and John Hopkins have noted, it is simply assumed that these issues are derivative of, or reflective of, issues that arise in congressional or state legislative redistricting.

Contact Information:

baldyctr@buffalo.edu

http://www.law.buffalo.edu/baldycenter/redistrictingConference/

Call for Papers: Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts: “Land Ownership and Tenure”

Call for Papers:

UN-Habitat, http://www.unhabitat.org/images/clear.gifThe United Nations Human Settlements Programme, concluded that more than one billion people live without any security of tenure in informal settlements in developing countries. While most developed countries have records that cover most of their territories, very few countries in the Global South have such records. This discrepancy underscores the unjust politics of landownership and land distribution that contributed to an inequitable world politics of social progress and human development.

The politics of access to and exploitation of land and natural resources assume fundamental relations of power control and policy of social inclusion; however, both notions imply and consolidate that the access to land and landownership, particularly in the Global South, reflects broader patterns of intra-institutional dynamics that explain how marginality and socio-political exclusion take place within countries and in the global stage. Understanding these dynamics, in the context of landownership, enable us to recognize who benefiting from current global politics of unequal developmental process that often requires access to, and ownership of public land. 

One might asks where we can draw the lines amongst legal access and normative rights to land, and the epistemological narrative (such as truth, believe and justification) that legitimize grabbing of public land in the name of social and economic progress. In other words, how the logic of landownership could be defined in increasingly diverse world that governs by a single economic ideology of market liberalization.

Topics of inquiry can include but are not limited to:

  • How race relations impact the accessibility to land and land distribution in marginalized communities?
  • How ethnic minority define their rights and access to land in the age of neo-liberalism?
  • In which ways, equal citizenship status has been affected by access to land and land rights in countries across the Global South?
  • How we can assess the concept of collective landownership and access to land that reside within indigenous people’s cosmovision vs. individualized notion of ownership that increasingly informs the scrambling attitude of corporations to acquire land in the Global South?
  • How do these issues continue to play out in the United States in particular and North America in general? In Europe?
  • How we can envision alternative and practical aspect of a democratic and collective community-based ownership and access to land, and what that conceptualization would looks like in the age of economic globalization?
  • The effectiveness of land-certification projects and other pro-poor legislation for racial and ethnic minorities.

Papers must be received by September, 15, 2011 to be considered for publication in this issue.

Please send manuscript publications to the managing editor: Leslie Shortlidge Shortlidge.2@osu.edu.  See Style Guidelines at www.raceethnicity.org.

Contact Information:

Leslie Shortlidge
Shortlidge.2@osu.edu

http://raceethnicity.org/call4paper5-3.html

20th Anniversary Land Use Conference

Date(s) of Conference:

March 3-4, 2011

Location:

University of Denver
Sturm College of Law

Description:

The Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute’s 20th Anniversary presents a singular
opportunity to explore both change and continuity in the region’s communities
and landscapes over the past two decades while beginning to look ahead to the
next twenty years, to the Next West.

An extraordinary confluence of forces is changing the way communities across
the West and the nation plan, grow and define their success. Climate change,
technology, globalization, urbanization and a new wave of immigration are
challenging old rules and patterns of development—both physical and economic.

As the region begins to emerge from the current economic crisis, professionals
and citizens alike will need to understand the forces driving our land use and
development patterns, forces that cut across geography, disciplines, fields and
sectors. Like never before, they will be called upon to design new models that
join prosperity, community and ecology in a bold vision tailored to the needs of
a rapidly changing region in a radically changing world.

Contact Information:

Lisa Bingham, Program Coordinator
lbingham@law.du.edu

http://www.law.du.edu/index.php/rmlui

Planning, Law, and Property Rights Fifth International Conference

Date(s) of Conference:

May 25-28, 2011

Location:

University of Alberta
Edmonton, AB T6G 2H5
Canada

Description:

The conference sessions will provide an exciting opportunity for scholars from around the world to present innovative research and engage in interdisciplinary exchange related to the theme of the Association – the study of the connections, in the broadest sense, between Planning and Law.

Both Law and Planning are social institutions aimed at promoting the public interest while safeguarding individual liberties. Both guide private decision making, but derive strength and authority from citizen participation. The challenges facing policy makers today emphasize the need to study the ways in which the law enables and restricts planning.

Call for Papers:

We invite papers on all topics related to law and planning, including all legal aspects of urban, regional, and rural planning; land use regulation; property rights, expropriation and compensation; housing; and public-private cooperation. We encourage submissions from researchers working in such areas as GIS, real estate, economics, and natural resources.

Submit your abstract by December 15, 2010.

Contact Information:

plpr2011@law.ualberta.ca

http://www.law.ualberta.ca/plpr/2011/call_for_papers.php

Tribes, Land, and the Environment

Date(s) of Conference:

February 25, 2011

Location:

American University
Washington College of Law
Washington, D.C.

Description:

Native American tribes have a far more complex relationship with the environment than is captured by the stereotype of Indians as environmental stewards. Meaningful tribal sovereignty requires non-Indians to recognize the right of Indians to determine their own relationship to the land and the environment. But tribes do not exist in a vacuum, they are deeply affected by off-reservation activities and similarly tribal choices often impact neighboring communities. Characterized in the 1830s by the U.S. Supreme Court as “domestic dependent nations,” Indian governments today have regulatory and governance authority over everything from air quality to the terms of mineral leases.

The number of Indian nations and the particular challenges faced by each tribe makes generalizations regarding either tribal environmental policies or the nature of the relationship between tribes and environmental organizations especially problematic. That being said, the centrality of land to many indigenous peoples offers the possibility that Indian understandings of environmental issues could inform non-Indian society. Reactions of non- Indian governments and environmental organizations to tribes that seek to develop in ways reflective, or not reflective, of off-reservation practices and policies shed light on how non-Indians view tribal sovereignty. Too often the multi-dimensionality of Indians is lost as they are reduced to an easily digestible typecasts of earth-loving conservationists or un-American groups that should fade into history.

Tribes face many challenges in attempting to establish their own developmental and environmental standards within the federal Indian law and environmental law structures. Native Americans living on reservations have among the highest levels of poverty and unemployment in the United States and, given the economic hardships of tribal members, tribal leaders have very difficult choices to make when it comes to environmental protection. Growing awareness of climate change will bring greater attention to the disproportionate impact global warming will have on vulnerable tribal communities – from ice-melt problems the Inuit are now struggling with to increased desertification of Navajo and Hopi reservation land – as well as on the significant impact tribal decisions can have on non-Indians. Universal agreement among scholars does not exist on such fundamental questions as whether tribes should be subject to federal environmental protection guidelines. Only by both acknowledging the value Indians place in land and simultaneously escaping the limitations inherent in such stereotypes can the complexities and challenges of Indian environmental issues be understood.

Rather than getting lost in theoretical discussions of what is sovereignty and how do tribes think about the environment, new insights can be gleaned from a focus on tribal land and property law. A reservation and tribal land- centric approach involves looking at the practice of tribal sovereignty, as experienced by Indians and non-Indians. Particular uses of tribal land will often be associated with off- reservation externalities and the same can be said for the impact uses of off-reservation land will have on Indian communities. Land issues are inherently local, as are development choices, and by focusing on tribes, land, and the environment, hopefully participants will add to the literature in novel and grounded ways.

Call for Papers:

Proposals: Please email Sarah.Krakoff@colorado.edu or erosser@wcl.american.edu proposed topics with your tentative title and abstract by Aug. 1, 2010. Selected proposals will be notified on a rolling basis, but by Aug. 15, 2010 at the latest. Topics of interest include everything from federal oversight of tribal environmental decisions to land and environmental institution building by tribal governments. If you have questions, please contact the conference organizers.

Completed Papers: The hoped for length of chapter contributions is approximately 10,000 words including references. Complete author guidelines will be sent to those whose proposals are accepted, but ideally endnotes/footnotes would be kept to a minimum for the sake of readability.

Contact Information:

Sarah Krakoff
University of Colorado Law School
407 Wolf Law Building Boulder, CO 80309
http://lawweb.colorado.edu/profiles/profile.jsp?id=31
Sarah.Krakoff@colorado.edu
(303) 492-2641

Ezra Rosser
American University Washington College of Law
4801 Massachusetts Ave, NW Washington, DC 20016
www.wcl.american.edu/faculty/rosser
erosser@wcl.american.edu
Note: Ezra will be in El Salvador until Jan. 2011 so if you would like to talk to him, please email him your number and a good time to call, or try 011-503-7023-7303.

http://www.wcl.american.edu/events/tle/

Litigating Regulatory Takings Challenges to Land Use and Environmental Regulations

Date(s) of Conference:

November 5, 2010

Location:

U.C. Berkeley School of Law
Berkley, California

Description:

This conference explores the regulatory takings issue as it relates to land use and environmental regulation.  The conference brings together a diverse group of leading scholars and experienced practitioners to discuss cutting-edge issues raised by recent and pending court cases and new regulatory initiatives.  Some topics to be discussed include the Supreme Court’s Stop the Beach Renourishment decision, the future of the judicial takings theory, takings questions raised by sea level rise and other consequences of climate change, controversial new decisions applying an expansive interpretation of the Penn Central analysis, and recent takings cases involving regulations of water use.

Contact Information:

Jane D’Antonio
Call:  802-999-1824 
Fax: 802-831-1043
Email: jdantonio@vermontlaw.edu

http://www.vermontlaw.edu/x11644.xml